april nick hornby copycat

Books Bought This Month
Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal by Mary Roach
The Robber Bride by Margaret Atwood
Relish: My Life in the Kitchen by Lucy Knisley
French Milk by Lucy Knisley
La Tartine Gourmande: Recipes for an Inspired Life by Béatrice Peltre

Books Received This Month
Zebra Forest by Adina Rishe Gewirtz (from publisher)
The Lake and the Library by S.M. Beiko (from publisher, not for public review)
The Nightmare Affair by Mindee Arnett (from publisher, not for public review)
Otherborn by Anna Silver (from publisher, not for public review)
Fraction of Stone by Kelley Lynn (from publisher, not for public review)
The Cadet of Tildor by Alex Lidell (from publisher, not for public review)
The Ruining by Anna Collomore (from publisher, not for public review)
The Symptoms of My Insanity by Mindy Raf (from publisher, not for public review)
The Art of Wishing by Lindsay Ribar (from publisher, not for public review)
Slated by Teri Terry (from publisher, not for public review)
The Sweet Revenge of Celia Door by Karen Finneyfrock (from publisher)
The Reece Malcolm List by Amy Spalding (from publisher, not for public review)
Kindness for Weakness by Shawn Goodman (from publisher)
Zenn Scarlett by Christian Schoon (from publisher, not for public review)
Coda by Emma Trevayne (from publisher, not for public review)
Beautiful Decay by Sylvia Lewis (from publisher)
Betty and Veronica: Storybook by Dan Parent (acquired during swap)
Archie: The Married Life (acquired during swap)

Books Borrowed This Month
Drama by Raina Telgemeier
Mary and The Wrongs of Woman by Mary Wollstonecraft
A Simple Story by Elizabeth Inchbald
Gallows Hill by Lois Duncan
Level 2 by Lenore Appelhans
The Fire Horse Girl by Kay Honeyman
Revolution 19 by Gregg Rosenblum
Breadcrumbs by Anne UrsuDeclarations of Independence: Empowered Girls in Young Adult Literature, 1990-2001Declarations of Independence: Empowered Girls in Young Adult Literature, 1990-2001 by Joanne Brown and Nancy St. Clair
The Distant Mirror: Reflections on Young Adult Historical Fiction by Joanne Brown and Nancy St. Clair
Granta 121: Best of Young Brazilian Novelists

Books Finished This Month
Loveroot by Erica Jong
Seventeenth Summer by Maureen Daly
Strands of Bronze and Gold by Jane Nickerson
The Tragedy Paper by Elizabeth LaBan
Dualed by Elsie Chapman
Drama by Raina Telgemeier
Gallows Hill by Lois Duncan
Young Adult Literature: From Romance to Realism by Michael Cart
The Dark by Lemony Snicket and Jon Klassen
The Lake and the Library by S.M. Beiko
If You Could Be Mine by Sara Farizan
The Fire Horse Girl by Kay Honeyman
Level 2 by Lenore Appelhans
Breadcrumbs by Anne Ursu
Betty and Veronica Storybook by Dan Parent
The Scrapbook of Frankie Pratt by Caroline Preston
The Distant Mirror: Reflections on Young Adult Historical Fiction by Joanne Brown and Nancy St. Clair

A more successful month, to be sure. Except that I bought lots of things. But to be fair, three of the books I bought because I was at author events, so I got them signed, which makes it all okay…? That’s what I’m going to tell myself, at least. I also discovered the titles of around 10 books I just had to add to my to-read list, which is probably not healthy given that I discovered that reading less is more and also that I will never whittle down my almost-400-title list. Whatever. Like I didn’t know that.

So a lot of titles were read in one entire today, because I have anxiety if I realize that I’m going to finish a book before I’m anywhere near home. Thursdays I spend a lot of time on the train because I volunteer far away, so a few titles were read entirely on one leg of the long roundtrip. That’s also where those titles that were not on my to-read list already come from, like Breadcrumbs and Gallows Hill, since I can’t be picky if I’m just picking out a book really quickly from a collection that’s not my own. Life is so hard sometimes, no?

I rearranged my bookshelves and have made four vertical piles of books on top of one of my more sturdy bookshelves rather than let my cheap Ikea shelves sag any more by the weight of way too many layers of reading material. Those piles are already veering on too high, and I’ve also placed a vertical pile in my linen closet, which just makes me sad. It also makes me strangely proud to be that much of a book person. If books make me bankrupt, which they probably will when I end up unemployed after graduation, at least I will have enough of them to make a cave. Seriously. I will live in an actual cave of books instead of an apartment I furnish to look that way. It’ll look great.

The semester is over aside from a lingering, terrifying paper, so I’m looking forward to more time for pleasure reading while I only take one class and one independent study this summer (how freeing! What a light schedule). Here’s to that.

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3 thoughts on “april nick hornby copycat

    • Obviously you have not read enough. I think Breadcrumbs is fine. It’s honestly no more amazing than lots of other retellings, and what puts it in a class of its own is just how perfectly it deals with race and adoption in the most offhand, wonderful way. So it’s interesting for that. Plus, you already have it at home, right?

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